Monthly Archives: February 2016

Stratasys to Present Power of 3D Printing to Improve Healthcare Results at

Stratasys to Present Power of 3D Printing to Improve Healthcare Results at
MINNEAPOLIS & REHOVOT, Israel–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS), the 3D printing and additive manufacturing solutions company, will be featured at the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2016 …
Read more on Business Wire (press release)

DragonFly 2020 Circuit Board 3D Printer Makes a Buzz at SOLIDWORKS World 2016

DragonFly 2020 Circuit Board 3D Printer Makes a Buzz at SOLIDWORKS World 2016
3dp_nanodimension_logo We've been keeping a close eye on Israeli company Nano Dimension for well over a year, since they first announced that they were developing the first-ever professional desktop printer for printed circuit boards (PCB). The eagerly …
Read more on 3DPrint.com

MarkForged unveils 40% faster Mark Two carbon fiber 3D printer

MarkForged unveils 40% faster Mark Two carbon fiber 3D printer
Ambitious businesses and 3D printing enthusiasts have been flocking to Dallas, Texas over the last few days in order to attend SolidWorks World 2016, a huge additive manufacturing expo which aims to connect SolidWorks-affiliated 3D printing companies …
Read more on 3ders.org (blog)

How 3D printing unraveled the iDracula/i orchid's disguise

How 3D printing unraveled the iDracula/i orchid's disguise
The misled insects then carry pollen from one flower to another, unintentionally helping the orchids reproduce. Now—using models from a 3D printer—researchers have shown how one such orchid tricks fungus-loving flies by mimicking the sight and smell …
Read more on Science Magazine

Review: MakerBot Replicator 3D printer adds its new Smart Extruder+

Review: MakerBot Replicator 3D printer adds its new Smart Extruder+
Last month, MakerBot began offering its Smart Extruder+, a new and improved print head for its flagship Replicator and Replicator Mini desktop 3D printers. The company claims the new Smart Extruder+ provides a more reliable printing process for its …
Read more on Computerworld

Printing functional semi auto rubber band gun on my Ultimaker 3D printer w/ test & commentary

Some people think that 3D printers can only make small solid items with no precision. This video will show you can you can print a semi automatic rubber band gun using a standard desktop 3d printer.

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You guys have been asking (and begging) for me to print a gun. It’s the number one request I get in my inbox on my YouTube channel. So I decided to take some baby steps in that direction and start by creating a less lethal weapon in the form of a semi automatic rubber band gun that shoots 6 projectiles. In this video I show you from start to finish the model, printing the model, assembling the model and shooting the model. For good measure I even add a Wicked Lasers Nano green to the gun for aiming and also have some fun at the end of the video with Battlefield 3. I hope you guys enjoy this video since it took a lot of time to produce compared to my other videos. Please let me know if you have questions in the comments below and also feel free to help answer other peoples questions.

This video features music by Kevin MacLeod under a royalty free CC license and his music is amazing so look him up on your favorite search engine if you enjoyed the music in this video!

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Rubberband Gun all pieces single plate, raft only. Dowels included.
http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:121658

Rubberband Gun all pieces single plate, raft only. Dowels included. by MAKERFAM is licensed under the Creative Commons – Attribution – Share Alike license.

Ultimaker Features
The assembled Ultimaker includes an Ulticontroller with LCD interface.
An extremely large build volume, 21x21x20.5 cm (L/W/H), while having a very desktop friendly footprint of only 35×35 cm.
The fastest controlled horizontal acceleration in the market, allows for extremely fast printing.
Connect the machine to your computer’s USB port, Drivers for Windows, Mac and Linux are available.
Capable of printing with biodegradable PLA plastics and ABS. For printing with ABS a heated bed is recommended. This allows for extremely affordable printing (plastics offered here). Feel free to use other materials! To get started we include the assembled Ultimaker with the first roll of Filament
Theoretical resolution: 0.0125 mm for the X and Y axis, the Z-axis is even more accurate!
A user-friendly, low-maintenance material feed mechanism (geared). Allows for mid-build material refills and color changes during prints.
The machine is very light-weight and robust, you can take it on a trip, without fear of it breaking. We use only hex nuts for T-slots and offer a very high quality barch wood.
Designed for quick assembly and easy maintenance.
Holds a reel of plastic for hassle free 3D printing.
Integrated electronics, no need to wire many boards together, everything is plugged into just once PCB.
The electronics provide the option to add a 5th stepper motor for later upgrades
Powered by free (libre) software. Based on Open Source Hardware (CAD files are published here!)

Technical specifications
High current MOSFETs that power the extruder, which heats up within 2 minutes.
Power: 110V-240V operation, 50-60Hz – 120W – 19V output.
The print head design uses a special ceramic heater cartridge, which is reliable, durable and extremely easy to install. The design does not use nichrome-wire. The entire hot-end can be assembled in under a minute. Also, it uses a glass filled injection moulded PEEK thermal barrier, that is more stable at high temperatures. This show is an independent production of Jerry Berg (aka Barnacules). Opinions are my own and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of my employer, friends, or any companies mentioned in the show. Email business inquiries to Barnacules@barnnerd.com Help the channel by donating BitCoin to 1MfVZVMjfUUq8srg1d4RbgXR5e7JLw7R6P
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The Reason 3D Printing Could Be Huge — Huge! — by 2025 Has to Do with Privacy

The Reason 3D Printing Could Be Huge — Huge! — by 2025 Has to Do with Privacy
The first time intellectual property attorney John Hornick saw a 3D printer at work, he thought it was a joke. It wasn't until a friend at Johns Hopkins University convinced him that the tech was the real deal that Hornick took a deep dive into how 3D …
Read more on Inverse